Crisis en Ribera del Duero

8 respuestas
    #1
    CritovLeuman

    Crisis en Ribera del Duero

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    Cata nº 72 de Verema.com (Valencia) 14 de junio de 2006.";La Ribera del Duero, donde nace la tempranillo más elegante está inmersa en una preocupante crisis.";Por favor, ¿podrían ser más específicos y desglosar el tema? ¿En qué consiste la supuesta crisis, cuáles son los principales factores involucrados, cuáles sus indicadores, desde cuándo se perciben?Gracias,C.L.

    #3
    CritovLeuman
    en respuesta a Paco Higón

    Re: Crisis en Ribera del Duero

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    I can write this in English of course, although my first attempt was to create the new topic in Spanish, with the surprise that the system didn’t allow it (I’ve just sent an email to the administrators, are you one of them?).
    Anyway, I read this in the home page (it is written in Spanish):

    Recorrido por la Ribera del Duero de Verema.com.
    La Ribera del Duero, donde nace la tempranillo más elegante está inmersa en una preocupante crisis.

    Well, looks like I don’t have much information about this. So I would simply ask:
    Crisis, what crisis?

    #4
    Paco Higón
    en respuesta a CritovLeuman

    Re: Crisis en Ribera del Duero

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    Well the fact is that there is a quite big crisis, with a good amount of cellars with notably quantities of unsold wine, with some others ’for sale’ and also with some others near bankruptcy… Of course this problems also affect the ’weak side’ of the industry, the vine growers, that are getting less and less money for the grapes they grow… You must take into account the the number of cellars in Ribera has grown steadily since the end of 80’s attracting a big amount of investments from people coming from out of the industry looking for easy money or just for prestige….

    Cheers!

    #5
    WaltZalenski
    en respuesta a Paco Higón

    Re: Crisis en Ribera del Duero

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    Paco,
    I have heard of anecdotal evidence from several sources that producers are able to by better and better quality fruit for less and less money from vinegrowers who do not produce their own wine. This seem to corroborate your point. On the other hand, I thought the overall statistics for Spain showed continual increase in the price for vineyard land, and I think this fact recently was discussed in connection with the Spanish wine critique of the EU proposal to eliminate vast amounts of vineyard land. Is Ribera del Duero the exception, or is the trend over the last several years suddenly reversing itself? Any personal thoughts about the market?

    According to La Federación Española del Vino (FEV), export trends for Spanish wine remain reasonably firm. In the last six months volumes are down by 4.6%, but the invoiced value is up by 4.8%. And the biggest growth market was the US, which is up 30% in value and 25% in volume, with a majority of product in D.O. bottled wines (as opposed to low-cost bulk wine).

    I think I personally contributed about half of the increase ;-)

    #6
    lito
    en respuesta a WaltZalenski

    Re: Crisis en Ribera del Duero

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    Hi there! Walt I guess that you work in the States Importing spanish wines or in marketing..I´m just curious. My wife is from N.Y. and we were working in the hospitality industry in the States.
    We were always looking for spanish wines, just to make our friends and family try them (Of course we tried a lot of New World wines, because as you know, in Roma as romans)
    By the way, I will suggest that the increase of the wines export into the States is because they still hold a good value for the money, and in general only the best is exported.

    Saludos desde Malaga

    #8
    Paco Higón
    en respuesta a WaltZalenski

    Re: Crisis en Ribera del Duero

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    Well Walt, land prices rise but almost never fall (this is a basic economic rule, at least in Spain) ;-). What we have seen is that land prices seem to be stabilised now (except for a few places like Priorat). Exportations are in a good situation but production has increased quite a lot because of a constant flow of investments in the sector in the whole Spanish territory….. so we have an striking stock of unsold wines from different vintages… Ribera is just an example -but rather impressing- of the effects of the old world wine crisis… and with the new European agricultural reform more is to come 8-0

    Let’s wait and see!

    Cheers!

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